Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Morning on the Britains Farm

It's going to be a very hot week here - mid to high 90s with rain from here on out.  We badly need the rain but I could do without the heat.  It was already unreasonable after breakfast so I made sure everyone had ample food, water and shade then came back inside.  Possibly at that point I played with toys.


Shepherds discussed the upcoming sheep dog trials.


The ducks and geese were fed along with the lone chicken.


The bees are doing well.


Some of the cows were milked.  The lady in white is actually a laundress, but don't tell her.


Others grazed.  The old cow bell was from my grandparent's farm.


The pigs had breakfast.  Bonus rural street cred to anyone who can tell me what the object behind them is. Hint: it's pig related.  Second hint: I very much doubt anyone uses these anymore.


Mrs. Patmore walked the dogs.

I love these old farm toys. They are made of lead and very tiny.  Most of them are Britains or JohillCo.  Some of them are unmarked.  They've mostly come from Ebay and second-hand shops and are well-worn and played with.

10 comments:

  1. Well worn and played with is a fantastic byline for any toy.

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    1. I love to think about who played with them before I got them, a couple of the sheep were mailed to me from England.

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  2. Love all your farm toys! As far as that pig 'tool" goes I have no idea even though we have raised hogs for over two decades. You must tell me!

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    1. Donna, what did you use in place of one of these (see below)? Or did you skin them?

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  3. You've got to tell us what the object behind the pigs is. I have no idea and now my curiosity is killing me.

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  4. Looks like the scrapers we use to scrape the hair off a scalded hog in the butchering process. Still in use by some.

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    1. Yay! That's it - it's an antique hog scraper. I've read that it's used to get the hair off of the hide after the pig has been scalded. I love pork rinds as much as the next gal but wow, that doesn't sound like an easy or fun job. I checked after I posted this - you can still buy them new at places like Lehman's.
      Also, I had no idea that four people even read my blog. LMAO. Thanks everyone, it's a good day.

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    2. It's not as hard as you would think. With enough hands and experience, it's faster than skinning. Not too long ago, it would be a family affair at my grandparents' farm. And the cracklin's (pork rinds) are well worth it

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    3. I bet they were absolutely delicious made like that. We press cider as a family and the more people involved = better it tastes. These things are being lost in our culture and it is so sad.

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